Search Results for: sour cherry

Sour Cherry Pierogies from Pierogi Love: New Takes on an Old-World Comfort Food
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Sour Cherry Pierogies from Pierogi Love: New Takes on an Old-World Comfort Food

“Pierogi dough recipes are like red sauce recipes (or pot roast recipes, or spanakopita recipes, or latke recipes)—if it’s been passed down through generations of family cooks, every single version is going to be a little different from someone else’s. It’s like playing recipe telephone, basically. Without a Polish babcia to show me the One True Way, I never had the burden of tradition weighing upon me when I started experimenting with various pierogi doughs, and this is what I’ve come up with as my go-to recipe.”

Snapshots: Grand Central Market, Los Angeles
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Snapshots: Grand Central Market, Los Angeles

“The purveyors inside are a mix of traditional and new vendors that make the mammoth market equal parts restaurant and grocery store: prepared dishes that run the gamut from penang curry to pupusas to omnipresent tacos al pastor, and ingredients ranging from dried chiles to sushi-grade fish to freshly cranked pasta to dish soap and sponges in the subterranean discount store.”

Ethiopian Dessert Pierogies: A Cross-Cultural Treat
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Ethiopian Dessert Pierogies: A Cross-Cultural Treat

“Her menu includes a house-made version of the traditional fried pastries known as destaye, an Amharic word which translates to “my happiness” and a fitting term for an end-of-meal treat. Chef Almaz’ triangular pastry shells are filled with a cardamom-scented mixture of coconut, raisins, and nuts that also makes for an unexpected pierogi filling.”

A Whole Grain Fruit Tart for Any Season
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A Whole Grain Fruit Tart for Any Season

“This tart could just as easily be made with all all-purpose flour or a half-and-half blend of all-purpose and whole wheat, but if you’ve got odds and ends of random whole-grain flours taking up space in your fridge or freezer, feel free to play around with this recipe to use them and clear out a little extra room. It’s also totally fine to use whatever fresh or frozen fruit you have on hand—sweet plums and nectarines mixed with last year’s frozen raspberries, or the first fresh blueberries with frozen peaches are equally appealing.”

A Burger That Doesn’t Need Heinz at Pittsburgh’s Butterjoint
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A Burger That Doesn’t Need Heinz at Pittsburgh’s Butterjoint

“It’s a simple operation: freshly ground local beef, your choice of cheese, onions, bacon, and—in my opinion—the secret weapon that makes the Butterjoint burger sing like no other: smoked rhubarb ketchup. Sweet and tangy, its acidity is an addictively refreshing counterpoint to nutty Gruyere and drippy beef fat, and even in this Heinz-proud town, it’s the one substitute I can’t stray from.”

In Berlin, All Culture is Local
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In Berlin, All Culture is Local

“The English language helps mediate between Japan and Germany, but how many times can you translate lotus root? Germans’ expectations might include filling meals, so how do you accommodate them to a cuisine that is meant to satisfy but not leave one in a blood-sugar-induced food coma? It’s not easy.”

Roasted Peach Gazpacho
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Roasted Peach Gazpacho

“Since gazpacho is chilled, I love the sweetness that peaches bring to this soup, the cool temperature taking the edge off their syrupy taste. Ripe tomatoes are dusty and robust, balancing the peaches with their own kind of earthy freshness. And rounding the whole thing out is garlic, one of my favorite pairings with peaches, and a little bit of cinnamon. It’s so incredibly simple, but makes for a unique twist on a classic soup for summer.”

Who To Trust When Eating at the Venice Biennale?
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Who To Trust When Eating at the Venice Biennale?

“When in a new city and trying to answer the question “where should we eat?”, one is almost always faced with the related question: Who to trust? From TripAdvisor, to colleagues and friends to Anthony freakin’ Bourdain, opinions are easy to come by but hard to quantify. And when you’ve only got three days in Venice and have 10:00 am to 6:00 pm devoted to walking every last inch of the Venice Biennale Arte1, you don’t want to waste a single meal!”